Leeza

By addressing the suffering that is occurring here and now, which in many respects is no different than the human suffering that has been ongoing for thousands of years. Equally, it’s about meeting people where they are, having some sense of the common language and modern perceptions. On the whole, it’s an invitation to open up to life as if it mattered. With the dominance of western culture in this age, there seems to be an ever growing sense of doubt. Doubt shows up in such subtle and obvious ways. Encouraging people to look deeper into the source of their doubt is a daily opportunity to witness an aliveness emerge, as they discover what has obscured their view.

Virginia

You mean should we speak to the false “Gods” of our culture, like greed, and personal peace and affluence, desire and sanctioning of war, ignoring our treatment of our Earth by gorging on her resources? Maybe we should also speak to the fear that pervades the very institutions of our culture, causing us to have “insurance” for every calamity that could befall us, and having health insurance and life insurance for the unknown “acts of God.” My spirituality teaches me that what I see “out there” is a reflection of my inner state of consciousness. So rather than judge the outside too harshly, I look within, and ask myself, where are my hypocrisies? What fears do I hold today? Do I have any “wars” with people I know that reflect the struggles between nation states. Yes, my spirituality has a lot to say about the modern age. But it also has a lot to say to my heart.

Wren

You evoke the “Modern age.” Not sure what is meant by that? “Modernism is just, like, you know… so over dude.” (Jacques Derrida)